Upcoming Event – Copyright Issues for Digital Archives [DAS] course

6 11 2013

The Michigan State University Archives and Historical Collections is hosting a Society of American Archivists course.

 

Copyright Issues for Digital Archives [DAS]

Monday, December 2, 2013

Michigan State University – East Lansing, MI – Register here

http://saa.archivists.org/events/copyright-issues-for-digital-archives-1463/455/

This course covers copyright legal issues specific to archives of digital material. You’ll examine the impact of electronic technologies on the long-held law and tenets of copyright, including digital rights management, and acquiring and advising on the use of rights in records. You’ll look at the basic text of relevant federal statutes and significant case law, as well as examining case studies. While participants should be familiar with basic copyright law, a very brief review of copyright essentials will be provided to ground the discussion. The focus of the day will be on how to think through and identify options for resolving the most commonly-encountered copyright legal issues around electronic records.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:

  • Recognize and discuss common legal issues relating to copyright issues in general and for digital archives in particular;
  • Interpret these issues from an archivist’s perspective;
  • Realize when ingested records pose possible copyright legal issues;
  • Identify, employ, analyze and compare the ramifications of a variety of legal steps that you might take to prevent or address one of the legal issues; and,
  • Communicate and work more effectively with your legal counsel and administration.

Who should attend?  Archivists and others who need to address copyright legal issues relating to the digital archives of their institutions.

What should you know?  You should have intermediate to advanced knowledge of archival practices and basic knowledge of copyright law and application in archives, including an understanding of the basic copyright terms typically found in donor or deed of gift agreements.

 

This course is one of the Tactical & Strategic Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program and builds on others including Basic Electronic Records and Providing Access to Digital Archives. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you’ll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

Attendance is limited to 35.





Answers to the American Archives Month 2013 Trivia Contest

5 11 2013

AAM_poster_2013

Our 2013 Trivia Contest featured questions about athletics at Michigan State University.  Twenty-eight people entered and two people answered all eight questions correctly.  We will be contacting the winners soon.

The staff at the University Archives & Historical Collections would like to thank everyone for playing and we hope that you will participate in our contest again next year!

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1. What was the first year the Michigan State football team played in the Big Ten Conference?

b. 1953

Michigan State was officially admitted into the Big Ten Conference in 1949.  Since the football schedules are set years in advance, the Spartans had to wait until 1953 to play their first Big Ten football game.

2. Which Michigan State boxer was undefeated in every college bout he fought?

d. Chuck Davey

Chuck Davey (center)

Chuck Davey (center)

Boxer Chuck Davey went undefeated in every college bout he fought, was 3 times voted the NCAA’s outstanding boxer, and fought at the 1948 Olympics.

The other three boxers listed as choices in the contest also had notable accomplishments. John Horne won three consecutive NCAA titles between 1958 and 1960, was a two-time All-American, and competed without a regular coach, program or sparring partner.  Herb Odom (1952-1955) was back-to-back NCAA Champion at 147 pounds (1954-1955), led MSU to a 1955 team National Championship, was a two-time All-American (1954-1955), and compiled a 29-5-2 career record.  Choken Maekawa of Hawaii won the 1956 NCAA individual title and was awarded the John S. LaRowe Trophy (outstanding boxer of the tournament).  He was chosen for the 1956 U.S. Olympic team, but did not make weight at the official weigh-in and was disqualified from competition.

Note: According to the U.S. Social Security Death Index, his last name was spelled Maekawa.  In some sources, his last name is spelled Mackawa, hence the misspelling in the trivia contest.

Women's Basketball article from February 1, 1898 issue of the MAC Record

Women’s Basketball article from February 1, 1898 issue of the MAC Record

3. What year did women form their first basketball team at Michigan State?

b. 1898

The first women’s basketball team at Michigan State played against teams such as Lansing High School, the teachers from the Flint School for the Deaf, and the Michigan State Normal School (now known as Eastern Michigan University).

4. Prior to being “The Spartans,” what was Michigan State’s nickname?

d. Aggies

Being an agricultural school, Michigan State’s original nickname was the Aggies. After the 1925 name change from Michigan Agricultural College to Michigan State College of Agriculture and Applied Science, a contest was held to pick a new nickname.  Dissatisfied with the winning choice of “Staters,” LSJ sports writer George S. Alderton looked through the other entries and picked “Spartans.”  Unfortunately, it is unknown who submitted the entry.

Gideon Smith

Gideon Smith

5. What year did Michigan State’s first African American athlete, Gideon Smith, begin playing?

c. 1913

Gideon “Charlie” Smith helped the Michigan State football team score their first win against the University of Michigan in 1913.  He played until 1915, leaving with a 17-3 record.  For more about Gideon Smith, please read Steve Grinczel’s article on MSUSpartans.com 

6. In 1895 Shoichi Yabina was the first Michigan State student to participate in which sport?

Shoichi Yebina (front, right side)

Shoichi Yebina (front, right side)

a. Fencing

Shoichi Yabina (class of 1895) participated in the first fencing match at the 1895 MIAA field day.  He defeated his opponent, Mr. Swift, from the Michigan State Normal School (EMU).  The sport was revived in 1924 by French professor Omar M. Lebel, and Joseph Waffa, an Egyptian student.

Note: His last name may have been spelled Yebina.

7. In May 1910 Michigan State faculty approved regulations for student athletes.  Which of these were included?

d. All of the above

The faculty regulations stated that students must compete under their own names, could not be compensated for playing and freshmen were not allowed to play intercollegiate sports.  Additionally, student’s eligibility was limited to three years, the football team could not practice until the school year started, they could only play teams from other colleges, and the number of games played was limited (9 for football, 16 for baseball and basketball).

8. What was the name of the first baseball club formed at Michigan State in 1865?

c. Stars

The Stars baseball club played against teams in the surrounding community.





More Spooky Stories from the MSU Archives

31 10 2013

Is there life after death?  Can the spirits of our loved ones communicate with us from the great beyond?

Spiritualism, the belief that the dead are able and willing to communicate with the living, was all the rage in 19th century America.  Channeling, séances, and other purported methods of communicating with the dead were even quite popular in rural Michigan.  Three separate collections in the MSU Archives contain spirit communications.

miller_a

Letter to Arnold Miller from his father in the spirit world

The first comes from the Miller family papers.  The patriarch of the family, Arnold W. Miller (1823-1911), was a farmer in Brady Township, Saginaw County, Michigan (http://goo.gl/MuYhvh).  There are several letters from his brother, Jasper Miller, who corresponded with Arnold from the spirit world via his niece, Carrie Rooney, who was a medium.  The letters, dated 1902 through 1906, were written using a “magic pencil,” according to a note kept with the materials.  Likely, Ms. Rooney held this magic pencil and the spirits controlled what she wrote.  The letters describe the “Spirit World” and explain how happy its residents are.  In one undated letter, Jasper Miller writes:

“How foolish and out of reason theology is how I wish all the earth knew of this blessed truth that spirits can and do commune with mortals.  We are laboring to enlighten all we can hoping to ere long help all to see the beauty of it the [times?] you wondered if we knew each other here how I wanted to tell you how much more natural this life is than earth life.  Yes dear brother we know each one here better than when on earth for here we can read the souls and know every man for no one can hide anything at first though one would not like that that all ones thoughts were known but when the soul has been purified you will have nothing to hide there is to such wonderful and beautiful places of learning there is always a desire to learn no matter how old one is you know and the more one learns the greater is the desire to learn more.”

Another example is a Spirit Communication notebook in the Samuel Johnson papers.  The johnson_7_aprovenance of the notebook is not clear.  It was, at some point, placed in the collection, but the names mentioned are not found elsewhere in Samuel Johnson’s papers.  Most of the letters are written to Andrew and Jaime from various spirits, including King, and Jaime Peabody (both of whom seem to be some type of guardian), Charles (Pa), Mother, Grandma Lemon, and Jim.  A medium, Mrs. Denslow, is responsible for most of the writings, although Andrew was being taught how to channel.  The first few entries explain the importance of keeping Mrs. Denslow around because the spirits and mortals will be able to accomplish much through her.  Clearly, their pleas were heeded, as Mrs. Denslow remained with the family from November 8, 1891 to April 23, 1892.

Mrs. Denslow used a technique called slate writing to commune with the spirit world.  Two slates would be fastened together with the writing surfaces facing inward and a pencil would be placed between the slates.  The medium and one of the family members would hold the slates while the spirit wrote its message.  Once finished, the spirit would move the pencil out from between the slates.  Jane B. Johnson then transcribed the messages, typically along with the date, time, and people present, into her Spirit Communication notebook.

Part of a letter to Jaime from Mother Cathcart

Part of a letter to Jaime from Mother Cathcart

Occasionally, Jane also noted how long the writing took or other details, such as what the handwriting looked like.  In one entry, Jane notes “The slate was found on the book case in the parlor the eve of Ap. 15th 1892 with the above message on it.  Where or when written no mortal knows.  Later King says Pa wrote it while Mrs. Denslow was playing on the piano and I looking over some music just before supper.”

Despite Andrew’s training as a medium, once Mrs. Denslow left the household the spirit writings ceased.

Both collections are open to researchers at the MSU Archives, along with stories of murder, mayhem, and betrayal.

Sources:

Arnold W. Miller papers (00008). Finding aid: http://archives.msu.edu/findaid/008.html

Samuel Johnson papers (UA 17.120). Finding aid: http://archives.msu.edu/findaid/ua17-120.html

Happy Halloween from the MSU Archives staff!

Happy Halloween from the MSU Archives staff!





Spooky Stories from the MSU Archives

28 10 2013

Spooky Poster_lgBoo! Did I scare you? With only a couple days left until Halloween, it seems that everyone has been double checking over their shoulders for movements in the dark and jumping at things that go bump in the night.  While we can almost always blame these spooky moments on our own imaginations playing tricks on us, here at the archives we’ve been researching real life events that have the potential for the next scary movie to hit the theaters.  From spirit communications to grisly crimes, from vengeful wives to grave guardians, the MSU Archives has information on all sorts of thrilling stories, so if you’re looking for a good scare this Halloween season, be sure to stop by and do some of your own research.

On the evening of March 9, 1977, while MSU students were studying for upcoming exams and goofing off in their dorm rooms, Francine Hughes, a resident of Dansville, MI, arrived at the Ingham County Sheriff’s Department crying and rambling about setting a bed on fire.  It wasn’t long until the whole story had come out – that night Hughes had put her four children in the family car, poured gasoline in a circle around the bed her husband was sleeping on, ignited the gasoline, and sped off to the jail, with her children in tow.  The police department, taking action immediately, confirmed that the house had been set ablaze, and that Hughes’ husband had been found dead on the floor outside of the bedroom that the married couple had shared. 

A004291

Francine Hughes, arrested and tried for the murder of her husband, James Hughes

Later investigations uncovered the fact that Francine Hughes had been brutally abused by her husband, James Hughes, both physically and emotionally for years. She had divorced him, but pressure from his family to return and care for him after he had experienced a bad automobile accident was overwhelming, and she gave in.  Years later, after suffering the continuing abuse, she got her revenge.

Hughes was found not guilty by reason of temporary insanity.  Her story was turned into a book and a TV movie starring Farrah Fawcett.  “The Burning Bed” helped raise awareness about domestic violence.

Vengeful wives aren’t the only topic of spooky interest at the MSU Archives.  In fact, the MSU Archives has the first hand account of James L. Lucas, who had been a special body guard for the corpse of John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Abraham Lincoln.  He recounts the body of Booth, after he had been shot on the morning of April 26, being taken onto the USS Montauk.  The blankets in which the body had been wrapped were soaked in blood, and his face was coated in dust from the long journey to the Potomac.  Lucas, along with three other soldiers, were to watch over the body in secrecy, to make sure no sympathizers got word of where the body was being kept.  They were given instructions to fire at any boat that attempted to rescue the body.  Later, he recounts, the A002657body was then buried in the Old Penitentiary in the capitol.  He refers to the job as a “distasteful duty,” as anyone having to watch over a corpse would.

Looking to read more about either of these stories? Take a visit to the MSU Archives and learn more about how Francine Hughes’ took her husband’s life or how James Lucas had to watch over the dead body of the the killer of one of the most well known presidents of America.  In fact, the archives has plenty more gory, grisly stories like this, and with only a couple days left until Halloween, come get in the mood for this spooky day and read some more real-life horror stories.

Sources:

Mary Jo Tormey collection (c.00600). Finding aid:  http://archives.msu.edu/findaid/c600.html

James L. Lucas manuscript (c.00086). Finding aid: http://archives.msu.edu/findaid/c086.html

Digitized copy of Lucas manuscript





American Archives Month 2013

1 10 2013

AAM_poster_2013

American Archives Month is celebrated every October to promote the value of archives and archivists.  The Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections (UAHC) is responsible for collecting and preserving the historical records of the nation’s pioneer land-grant university.  In essence, the university archives is the memory of MSU.  Our collections contain documents, photographs, scrapbooks, diaries, and audio and visual recordings on a variety of topics, including athletics, student life, and Michigan History.  UAHC is a valuable resource for the MSU community, historians, publishers and producers, K-12 students, teachers, genealogists, and the general public.

To celebrate American Archives Month, the MSU Archives & Historical Collections is holding a trivia contest that focuses on the history of athletics at MSU. The contest is open to MSU faculty, staff and students, MSU alumni, and the greater Lansing community. This contest will end on Thursday, October 31. Three winners will be chosen at random from among the correct entries and will be notified the following week.  The contest is available online at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CN5SH6C.

Additionally, we will be showcasing our collections during two events offered through Alumni LENS (formerly Evening College).  First is a two-night presentation by Assistant Director Portia Vescio titled “Toil and Trouble at MSU.”  On October 16 and 23, Portia will tell stories of rascals and riots, horrific pranks and libelous publications—just a few of the colorful items from MSU’s historical and (sometimes) troubling times. You will be able to view some of the original materials from the University Archives’ collections that document these times.  For more information, please visit http://alumni.msu.edu/programs/lens/courseSummary.cfm?activity=76.

The second offering is a tour of the MSU Archives hosted by Collections & Outreach Archivist Megan Malone.  The tour includes the Archives’ closed stacks, which are usually off-limits to the public.  You will have the opportunity to view archival gems such as the earliest campus maps and photographs, unique student publications, Rose Bowl programs, diaries and letters of MSU presidents and the letter that Charles Darwin wrote to William Beal. You will also see our Historical Collections, materials not directly related to MSU, but of great historical significance. These materials include Civil War diaries and letters, ledgers from the Battle Creek Sanitarium and photos from the REO Motor Car Company.  For more information, please visit http://alumni.msu.edu/programs/lens/courseSummary.cfm?activity=69.





MSU Assistant Archivist wins State History Award

30 09 2013

The Historical Society of Michigan presented the 2013 State History Awards Friday, September 27, at its Annual Meeting in Kalamazoo.  MSU Archives’ Assistant Records Manager, Jennie Russell, received the award for Best Article in Michigan History Magazine.

From the HSM press release:

Best Article in Michigan History Magazine

The inaugural award in this category went to “Spikehorn Meyer: His Own Tall Tale,” authored by Jennie Russell and featured in September/October 2012 issue of Michigan History magazine. John “Spikehorn” Meyer was considered the “most colorful character in the history of Clare County.” He was a farmer, machinist, lumberjack, and miner, but also spent his later years as the operator of a souvenir store and wildlife park outside Harrison. Russell’s article details Meyer’s antics at his private zoo, including allowing the public to feed the bears. Despite constant issues with former employees, the Michigan Department of Conservation, and the local police, Meyer’s zoo and his stories kept the public interested in him until he died in 1959.”

Congratulations Jennie!





Upcoming MSU Archives Events – Fall 2013

17 09 2013

We have a very busy fall schedule here at the MSU Archives!

The MSU Archives has two offerings in October through Alumni LENS (formerly Evening College).  First is a two-night presentation by Assistant Director Portia Vescio titled “Toil and Trouble at MSU.”  On October 16 and 23, Portia will tell stories of rascals and riots, horrific pranks and libelous publications—just a few of the colorful items from MSU’s historical and (sometimes) troubling times. You will be able to view some of the original materials from the University Archives’ collections that document these times.  For more information, please visit http://alumni.msu.edu/programs/lens/courseSummary.cfm?activity=76.

The second offering is a tour of the MSU Archives hosted by Collections & Outreach Archivist Megan Malone.  The tour includes the Archives’ closed stacks, which are usually off-limits to the public.  You will have the opportunity to view archival gems such as the earliest campus maps and photographs, unique student publications, Rose Bowl programs, diaries and letters of MSU presidents and the letter that Charles Darwin wrote to William Beal. You will also see our Historical Collections, materials not directly related to MSU, but of great historical significance. These materials include Civil War diaries and letters, ledgers from the Battle Creek Sanitarium and photos from the REO Motor Car Company.  For more information, please visit http://alumni.msu.edu/programs/lens/courseSummary.cfm?activity=69.  The correct address for the MSU Archives is: 888 Wilson Rd. Conrad Hall, Room 101.

We have several classes coming in this fall for instructional sessions on how to use archives.  During these sessions, students will have an opportunity to view archival materials from our collections.  MSU professors who would like to have their classes come into the MSU Archives are encouraged to contact Megan Malone.  These instructional sessions can be tailored to the specific needs of the students.

A training session on Records Management and Retention at MSU, provided through Human Resource Development, will be held October 17 from 2:30-4:30 pm.  Presented by Assistant Records Archivist Jennie Russell, this session will cover the rules, regulations, and strategies necessary to manage your unit’s records.  MSU employees can register through ebs.msu.edu.

On October 30 from 2:00-4:00 pm, a Research Data Management CAFE is being held in room 215 of the Computer Center. CAFEs are Communities for Advising, Facilitating and Enabling supported by the Vice Provost for Libraries and IT Services.  The Research Data Management CAFE is intended to facilitate cross-campus communication and knowledge sharing about research data management at MSU. The group will discuss topics related to research data management such as, but not limited to, documents for grant proposals, case studies, best practices, scholarly communication issues, application development, technology infrastructure, and services and support for researchers. The CAFE will meet quarterly during fall and spring semesters and it is open to all interested MSU faculty, staff, and students. The intended outcomes of the Research Data Management CAFE are to develop new professional networks and contacts, discover ways to improve campus offerings, and increase awareness of mutual challenges and goals.

Finally, October is American Archives Month!  American Archives Month is celebrated every October to promote the value of archives and archivists. We will be holding our annual trivia contest which will focus on MSU history.  More details will be available at the beginning of October.








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