Residence Hall Namesakes: Brody Neighborhood

11 02 2015

Brody Neighborhood

Brody Hall Cafeteria, 1954

Brody Hall Cafeteria, 1954

W. G. Armstrong Hall

Construction on Brody Complex, 1955

Construction on Brody Complex, 1955

W. G. Armstrong was an alumnus of Michigan State.  As many Spartans (once “Aggies” for Agriculture College), Armstrong was a farmer in his lifetime. After graduation, Armstrong continued his involvement with the college and became a member of the Board of Trustees. Armstrong Hall opened in 1956, along with two other Brody residence halls, Bailey and Emmons.

 

Liberty Hyde Bailey Hall

College Speculum Staff, Bailey seated second from left

College Speculum Staff, Bailey seated second from left

Liberty Hyde Bailey had his start as a Michigan State student in the Class of 1882. During that time, he founded and edited the Speculum, a student paper. Bailey studied with Dr. William Beal before becoming a professor himself. It is said that Bailey’s courses were so good that students were bringing their own seats to ensure they could attend his lectures. Bailey wrote more than 60 books and numerous articles, which became the backbone of horticulture literature. He was also known as the world’s “plant hunter.” Bailey was a man of science yet did not believe in Darwin’s theory of evolution, but rather took to the Bible’s origin of man. His name was a family name passed down by his abolitionist grandparents who used Liberty as a way to signify all deserved to be free.  Designed by Ralph Calder, Bailey Hall opened in 1955.

 

Claude S. Bryan Hall

Building Supervisor at Bryan Hall buffing the floor, 1957

Building Supervisor at Bryan Hall buffing the floor, 1957

Claude S. Bryan was Dean of Veterinary Medicine beginning in the late 1940’s. After he took the position, Bryan requested a change in facilities, class size, and pre-course work for veterinary students. Bryan’s efforts helped to create the Veterinary Medical Center on campus. Bryan Hall opened originally as an all male residence hall in 1954.

 

Kenyon L. Butterfield Hall

Butterfield Hall (Brody Complex), circa 1955

Butterfield Hall (Brody Complex), circa 1955

Kenyon L. Butterfield was a native Michigander from Lapeer. Butterfield graduated from Michigan State in 1891. After graduation, Butterfield held many positions in the area before returning to school to receive his Masters from the University of Michigan. Butterfield held presidency positions at two other colleges before resigning to return as president of Michigan State (1924-1928). Though a conflict over appointing two friends to executive positions at the college caused him to step down from presidency at Michigan State, Butterfield’s career included much more than his education positions and he held many international positions throughout his lifetime. Butterfield Hall first opened in 1954.

 

Lloyd C. Emmons Hall

An aerial view of Brody Complex, 1958

An aerial view of Brody Complex, 1958

Lloyd C. Emmons made many strides as a faculty at Michigan State. As Dean of the School of Science and Arts, also referred to as Liberal Arts, Emmons made many changes to programs and expectations within the school. While Dean, the a program for nursing was established in his school in 1950. Dean Emmons continued to teach for some time even while holding his position as a dean. Emmons was a professor of calculus. Dean Emmons also pushed for teacher preparation during his time at the college.  Emmons Hall first opened in 1955.

 

Howard C. Rather Hall

A view of Rather Hall, 1959

A view of Rather Hall, 1959

Howard C. Rather was a graduate of Michigan State. Part of the Class of 1917, Rather received a Bachelor of Science. Following his graduation, Rather joined the United States Army, and received an honorable discharge. After the war, Rather returned to Michigan State as a member of the faculty and eventually became a professor of Farm Crops. Rather also became the Dean of the Basic College during his career at Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU).  Rather Hall first opened in 1954, and its irregular plan is the reverse of Bailey Hall’s.

Written by Laura Williams

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