Residence Hall Namesakes: Brody Neighborhood

11 02 2015

Brody Neighborhood

Brody Hall Cafeteria, 1954

Brody Hall Cafeteria, 1954

W. G. Armstrong Hall

Construction on Brody Complex, 1955

Construction on Brody Complex, 1955

W. G. Armstrong was an alumnus of Michigan State.  As many Spartans (once “Aggies” for Agriculture College), Armstrong was a farmer in his lifetime. After graduation, Armstrong continued his involvement with the college and became a member of the MSU Board of Trustees. Bryan Hall opened in 1956, along with two other Brody residence halls, Bailey and Emmons.

 

Liberty Hyde Bailey Hall

College Speculum Staff, Bailey seated second from left

College Speculum Staff, Bailey seated second from left

Liberty Hyde Bailey had his start as a Michigan State student in the Class of 1882. During that time, he founded and edited the Speculum, a student paper. Bailey studied with Dr. William Beal before becoming a professor himself. It is said that Bailey’s courses were so good that students were bringing their own seats to ensure they could attend his lectures. Bailey wrote more than 60 books and numerous articles, which became the backbone of horticulture literature. He was also known as the world’s “plant hunter.” Bailey was a man of science yet did not believe in Darwin’s theory of evolution, but rather took to the Bible’s origin of man. His name was a family name passed down by his abolitionist grandparents who used Liberty as a way to signify all deserved to be free.  Designed by Ralph Calder, Bailey Hall opened in 1955.

 

Claude S. Bryan Hall

Building Supervisor at Bryan Hall buffing the floor, 1957

Building Supervisor at Bryan Hall buffing the floor, 1957

Claude S. Bryan was Dean of Veterinary Medicine beginning in the late 1940’s. After he took the position, Bryan requested a change in facilities, class size, and pre-course work for veterinary students. Bryan’s efforts helped to create the Veterinary Medical Center on campus. Bryan Hall opened originally as an all male residence hall in 1954.

 

Kenyon L. Butterfield Hall

Butterfield Hall (Brody Complex), circa 1955

Butterfield Hall (Brody Complex), circa 1955

Kenyon L. Butterfield was a native Michigander from Lapeer. Butterfield graduated from Michigan State in 1891. After graduation, Butterfield held many positions in the area before returning to school to receive his Masters from the University of Michigan. Butterfield held presidency positions at two other colleges before resigning to return as president of Michigan State (1924-1928). Though a conflict over appointing two friends to executive positions at the college caused him to step down from presidency at Michigan State, Butterfield’s career included much more than his education positions and he held many international positions throughout his lifetime. Butterfield Hall first opened in 1954.

 

Lloyd C. Emmons Hall

An aerial view of Brody Complex, 1958

An aerial view of Brody Complex, 1958

Lloyd C. Emmons made many strides as a faculty at Michigan State. As Dean of the School of Science and Arts, also referred to as Liberal Arts, Emmons made many changes to programs and expectations within the school. While Dean, the a program for nursing was established in his school in 1950. Dean Emmons continued to teach for some time even while holding his position as a dean. Emmons was a professor of calculus. Dean Emmons also pushed for teacher preparation during his time at the college.  Emmons Hall first opened in 1955.

 

Howard C. Rather Hall

A view of Rather Hall, 1959

A view of Rather Hall, 1959

Howard C. Rather was a graduate of Michigan State. Part of the Class of 1917, Rather received a Bachelor of Science. Following his graduation, Rather joined the United States Army, and received an honorable discharge. After the war, Rather returned to Michigan State as a member of the faculty and eventually became a professor of Farm Crops. Rather also became the Dean of the Basic College during his career at Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU).  Rather Hall first opened in 1954, and its irregular plan is the reverse of Bailey Hall’s.

Written by Laura Williams





Residence Hall Namesakes: North Neighbohood

9 02 2015

North Neighborhood

The Union Building Entrance, 1940s

The Union Building Entrance, 1940s

Theophilus C. Abbot Hall

The original Abbot Hall (1), undated

The original Abbot Hall (1), undated

Theophilus C. Abbot was a professor of English, history and philosophy at Michigan State. Abbot was also a president of Michigan Agricultural College (1862-1885) and, even after resigning from this position, continued to teach at the university. The original Abbot hall was located near Beaumont Tower and became the Music Practice Building. It was demolished in 1968. The current Abbot Hall is located in North Neighborhood and opened in 1939 as an all male hall.

 

Stevens T. Mason Hall

The Steps of Mason Hall

The Steps of Mason Hall

Stevens T. Mason, also known as “boy governor”, was the acting governor of the Michigan territory and led the fight to statehood when he became the first governor of the state. During his governorship, Mason worked to build railways that would connect the rural parts of the state to economically thriving east. First opened in 1938, Mason Hall was an all male hall costing a student three dollars per week. Later it became a women’s hall and eventually switched to a co-ed hall, as it is today.

Glenn Phillips Hall

Snyder-Phillips Residence Hall, 1954

Snyder-Phillips Residence Hall, 1954

Glenn Phillips was a well-known landscape architect. From 1922 until his death, he worked on Michigan State development. Phillips helped plan the landscape expansion of Michigan State’s campus during the 1930s. His worked planned around the beloved Circle (where Beaumont Tower and the Music Building stand) to preserve the area. He worked to expand along the Red Cedar riverbanks. A graduate of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU), Phillips was a student in the Class of 1902. Outside of Michigan State, Phillips worked for the United States Bureau of Forestry.

 

Jonathan L. Snyder Hall

President Roosevelt rides in a REO motor car with President Snyder beside him, 1907

President Roosevelt rides in a REO motor car with President Snyder beside him, 1907

Jonathan L. Snyder was President of Michigan State from 1896 to 1915. During his presidency, the school grew from a couple hundred students to 2,000. Snyder worked with the legislature to aid in the growth of Michigan State through the hiring of more faculty and the construction of additional buildings to accommodate more students on campus. A big moment during Snyder’s time at Michigan State came after his successful effort to bring President Theodore Roosevelt to speak at the college for the semi centennial celebration.

 

Louise H. Campbell Hall

Louise H. Campbell Hall

Louise H. Campbell Hall

Louise H. Campbell was a pioneer for women at Michigan State. Campbell established a program that would help rural women students teach back in their communities. She also initiated the Annual Homemaker’s Conference which brought thousands of women to campus each year to learn from one another. Campbell was the head of Home Economics in the 1920s and helped advance women all over the state. Louise H. Campbell Hall opened in 1939 as an all female residence hall.

Maude Gilchrist Hall

Class of 1907 co-eds, Dean Gilchrist listed bottom row, middle right

Class of 1907 co-eds, Dean Gilchrist listed bottom row, middle right

Maude Gilchrist was a botanist who came to Michigan State’s campus in the early 1900s. Later, Maude Gilchrist served as Dean of the Women’s Department. As a woman of science, Gilchrist pushed to have the women’s program at Michigan State expand past homemaking. She insisted courses in the program should include music, art, and literature. Her fight proved that these subjects were just as important for women to learn as home economics. Gilchrist Hall was built in 1948 and as another women’s hall, it took the name of on of Michigan State’s early leaders.

 Linda E. Landon Hall

Miss Landon reads in the Linton Hall library

Miss Landon reads in the Linton Hall library

Linda E. Landon was a cherished part of the university’s history. Landon served as the librarian from 1891 to 1932 in the building that is now Linton Hall. Landon was also the first woman to teach at Michigan State.  The course she taught was English composition back in the 1890s. Before joining the staff at Michigan State, Linda Landon was a teacher in Kalamazoo, Michigan. She had graduated valedictorian of her class in Niles, Michigan and continued to impress throughout her life. Landon was a Daughters of the American Revolution member, as well as an honorary member of the Men’s Union Library society, as unlikely as that may have seemed. Remembered fondly by students, Linda Landon was honored as the namesake for the first post-WWII hall, built in 1947.

Mary B. Mayo Hall

Mary Mayo Hall, 1940

Mary Mayo Hall, 1940

Mary Bryant Mayo is credited for taking action to create the first women’s program at the college. When she was told that her life after marriage was defined by her ability to make butter, she began to study and established reading clubs for local youth. Mayo did not leave her home county of Calhoun until she was an adult. Pushed by her disappointment in the lack of opportunity for her daughters to receive the same education as males, Mayo fought to establish the first Women’s Course in 1896. Built in 1931, Mayo Hall was one of the first residence halls to accommodate women, and rightfully named for a woman that worked for their place at the university.

Sarah L. Williams Hall

Williams Hall (2), 1940

Williams Hall (2), 1940

Sarah Langdon Williams, wife of the university’s first President Joseph Williams, was a fighter for women’s rights. Part of the women’s suffrage movement and good friends with suffragist Susan B. Anthony, Williams was the founder and editor of the official publication for the movement, the Ballot Box. Recorded as a women who put her “energy to the cause of humanity oppressed”, Sarah Williams served as a nurse on the front lines of the Civil war and proved her passion and fight for humanity throughout her life. In 1937, Williams Hall was erected and dedicated to the admirable Sarah Langdon Williams.

Elida Yakeley Hall

An aerial shot of the construction of Yakeley Hall, circa 1948

An aerial shot of the construction of Yakeley Hall, circa 1948

Elida Yakeley was the college’s first registrar in 1908. After holding the position for thirty years, Yakeley was remembered for personally knowing all of the students who registered through her, each time standing to greet the arriving new students at her big desk. Yakeley was also secretary to President Snyder from 1903 to 1908. In 1939, Elida Yakeley was recognized for her work collecting and classifying material that would prove important to the history of Michigan State and named an associate in historical research. When it was finished in 1948, the next women’s hall was named after the thoughtful Elida Yakeley.

Written by Laura Williams





Scrapbook History: Leon L. Budd

21 01 2015

The Michigan State University Archives hold materials that are decades and even hundreds of years old. Recently, pulled from the shelf was a scrapbook from a student that graduated from this university in 1915, exactly one hundred years ago.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Leon L. Budd’s memory book has specific pages for events to record throughout his college career. He records the scores of various sporting games and writes “Yell – Rah! Rah! Rah! Uzz! Uzz! Uzz! M-A-C!”. There is even a section for interactions with professors, where Budd notes that one of the most valuable lessons he learned was to “study chemistry”.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

The next section lists his dear friends, along with their happiest memories at Michigan Agricultural College. “It’s never late till 12 pm and it’s early after that” wrote John S. Hancock of Hart, Michigan. Budd’s friends proved to have some fun with the advice “If you can’t be good be careful”. A couple students bonded over their hall placement with the saying “To Hell with Wells and Abbot its Williams Hall for us” and the rivalry continued “To H—L with Williams – Wells is The Gentlemen’s Dorm”.
The happy thoughts did not disappoint, below are a few favorites:
“Of what shall man be proud of if he is not proud of his friends”
“MAC did it”
“RAH! RAH! For M.S.C.”
“Eat, drink, and be merry”
And of courses they remind us that Michigan’s cold hit this generation as well; “It’s so cold in here that the thermometer is froze”

The chants and songs during the football games shows just how much tension there was (and continues to be) between State and Michigan. Here are just a few of the “College Yells”:

We’ll rub it into Michigan, Michigan, Michigan;
Rub it into Michigan, M.A.C. can.
On to old Michigan.
Rub it into Michigan, M.A.C. can.

Hi-le, hi-lo, hilo,
Michigan’ chances grow slimmer and slimmer
Hi-le, hi-lo, hilo
Michigan’s chances must go.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

School dances were also recorded, with marks next to the name of the dances done at a party. Budd attended quite a few dance parties during his time at Michigan State.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Mr. Budd also has some memorabilia from days as an engineering student. One poster depicts a skeleton at a desk with an open book to “MAC valves”. The bottom of the poster reads “=Ye=Faithful=Engineer=”.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

The following pages are filled with pictures from Leon Budd’s time at MSC. They include the “Fresh-Soph Rush. 1912. ’16 vs ‘15”, places on campus, his friends, his love interest, and himself. Following those are pages of classic scrapbook findings, the football program, class schedules, and newspaper clippings from the games.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

We really get a glimpse into life at Michigan State during Leon Budd’s time here. The buildings have changed, the style is different, and the course options have diversified, but the smiles and comradely seen between Budd and his classmates seem to be an everlasting effect of time at Michigan State.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 – UA 10.3.124

Written by Laura Williams





MSU Archives Year in Review 2014

29 12 2014

For the Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections (UAHC), 2014 has been a busy and rewarding year.  The following are a few of the highlights of the past 12 months.

UAHC started taking small steps in preserving its audio-visual assets this past year. Interns indexed magnetic media, created a manual for handling and processing, indexed the film collection, replaced rusty canisters, and checked acetate degradation. UAHC also began setting up a video and audio digitization lab and identifying player equipment. In April 2014, a special fund was created to raise money for the AV collections, with advertising targeted to alumni (https://givingto.msu.edu/gift/?sid=1484). The “baby steps” approach to AV preservation was highlighted by the poster “One Reel at a Time: Facing the Reality of AV Collections,” presented by Cynthia Ghering and Portia Vescio at the October AMIA conference in Savannah, Georgia.

This past February, the MSU Office of the President unveiled the Morrill Plaza Kiosk, which honors the memory of the late, venerable Morrill Hall and highlights 100 past distinguished professors. Built in 1899, Morrill Hall was MSU’s first residential college for women; in later years and until its demolition in 2013, it provided offices and classroom space for the History and English Departments. UAHC contributed 490 historical photos for use in the kiosk.

The first phase of the Spartan Archive digital repository went live in June 2014. UAHC had received funding from NHPRC to develop a preservation environment for four series of database records from MSU’s Office of the Registrar—Academic Programs, Course Descriptions, Course Schedules, and the Student Directory—as a prototype for a trusted digital repository for born-digital institutional records. Spartan Archive is available at http://spartanarchive.msu.edu.

In September 2014, the third Mid-Michigan Digital Practitioners (MMDP) meeting was held at Central Michigan University. UAHC and the MSU Libraries formed MMDP in summer 2013 to bring together professionals engaged in creating and curating digital collections in Mid-Michigan and the surrounding region, including librarians, archivists, museum curators, historians, and more. Each of the biannual meetings held thus far has averaged 50 attendees. The next scheduled meeting is in Ann Arbor in Spring 2015. Information about past meetings may be found at http://archives.msu.edu/about/conferences.php?about_conferences

UAHC underwent much-need renovation and expansion in 2014. Over the summer, new moveable shelving and an air handler specifically designated for collection storage areas were installed. The next phase of the facilities upgrade, scheduled for completion in January 2015, includes expansion into the space next door to UAHC’s current office for a larger reading room, new workspace for students and interns, and the addition of another secure, climate controlled collections area.

MSU’s records management program, administered by UAHC, expanded its reach on campus with the addition of two new employees: Hillary Gatlin, University Records Manager, and Jennie Russell, Assistant Records Archivist. With this support, the records management program began a long-term project to complete a full revision of the existing university records retention schedules. This revision will ensure that the university’s records policies accurately reflect current record keeping practices, including the maintenance and disposal of electronic records.





Closing for Renovations

3 12 2014

From December 8, 2014 through January 23, 2015, the MSU Archives will be closed for on-site research.
This closure is due to renovations of our Reading Room and staff area. Archivists will be available by appointment.  Please contact the Archives to schedule an appointment or for more information.

Additionally, we will be closing at noon on Friday, December 5th to prepare for the renovations.

We are sorry for the inconvenience and will try to accommodate researchers’ requests as best we can.  We greatly appreciate your patience and understanding during this time.





A Timeline of the LGBT Community at Michigan State University

1 12 2014

Early twentieth century saw an almost non-existent gay population on campus and even in the area. Students recalled a time when there were no gay bars, no gay community, and not even a real way to identify as gay (History at MSU, Report). The 1950s saw “gay purges” where people would be requested to take a lie detector test at the police station where they were asked intimate details about possible gay relations and would often leave the community (History at MSU, Report). One man was banned from the ROTC after he had been questioned. There was a looming fear for safety and job security if the community found out someone was gay, and therefore creating support groups was not a safe choice. (The Final Report Vol. I of the University Wide Task-Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues, 1992: A History of the Gay and Lesbian Experience at Michigan State University)
In the 1960s, “homosexual activity” was added to the Michigan State University Department of Public Safety Annual report as a category of complaint. Within the first year that this category was added, there were fourteen different reports and six arrests made under that claim. The following few years saw a rise from six to twenty arrests (History at MSU, Report). This decade also saw the basement of the MSU Union Building remodeled after the men’s bathroom became known as a place for homosexual activity. (The Final Report Vol. I of the University Wide Task-Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues, 1992: A History of the Gay and Lesbian Experience at Michigan State University)
Michigan State and the East Lansing community went through great changes in the 1970s. The Gay Liberation Movement became a registered student organization in 1970 and was very active on campus, responsible for the establishment of Pride Week at State. 1970 was also the year that a Human Sexuality course at MSU included materials by gay/lesbian authors and provided a safe space for student to openly discuss sexual orientation. An openly lesbian professor at MSU provided a representation of success to students in the LGBT community of the ’70s. In 1974, the East Lansing Council passed a gay rights ordinance that prohibited discrimination in the workplace and public places. Though harassment still occurred, it gave public places more power to take action, just as Beggar’s Banquet did the following year when people were being harassed in their establishment. 1977 was a big year for change as it included both progress and discouragement. The Gay Liberation Movement became the Gay Council and picked up more power and steam on campus, an anti-gay crusade caused tension and controversy, and an amendment to the anti-discrimination policy was changed to include sexual orientation. A creative event called “Gay Blue Jeans Day” asked anyone who identified as gay to wear blue jeans on a particular day. Any person that was forgetful or unaware of the call for blue jeans and found themselves dressed in jeans on that day may feel the oppression that the lesbian and gay community felt on a daily basis. That same year, the ASMSU Student Board President attempted to disband the Gay Council after he claimed it was not like other minority groups where people are born a certain way and rather “gay people choose to be homosexual” (History at MSU, Report). His proposal was voted down. The following year, in 1978, an openly gay student won the presidency of ASMSU. (The Final Report Vol. I of the University Wide Task-Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues, 1992: A History of the Gay and Lesbian Experience at Michigan State University)

(UA 12.3.14, Box 4454)

Click to enlarge (UA 12.3.14, Box 4454)

In 1982, Delta Sigma Phi suspended one of their brothers on the grounds that he was “incompatible” with the fraternity due to his involvement on the Lesbian-Gay Council. Though the student had already chosen to move out of the house after feeling unconformable when his brother found out about his involvement, Delta Sigma Phi still chose to suspend him from any house activities. The Anti-Discrimination Judicial Board ruled that the fraternity was in violation with the anti-discrimination policy at MSU, but the fraternity repealed it. When they were rejected, the group threatened to sue the school if MSU President Mackey did not veto the ruling. Due to the fact that the Greek community is a separate entity, President Mackey overruled the Board’s decision and reinforced that choice with the claim that Greek Life functioned on a single-sex basis and therefore did not fall under the sex discrimination policy. Multiple deaths in the Lansing area due to AIDS called for a step-up in awareness from both Olin Health Center and the Gay-Lesbian Council. In 1987, The College Republicans tried to fight “Gay Blue Jeans Day” with “Straight Shirt Day” in hopes to offset the mission of the day, ASMSU condemned their attempt. Beginning in 1988, Michigan State saw a string of harassment and discrimination from students to students. A State News writer was attacked in one of the halls and warned that they should stop writing about gay/lesbian issues in the paper. The 1989 Pride Week was all but welcomed with chalked messaged of hateful and demeaning anti-gay messages on the Wells Hall Bridge, some of which directly targeted a Resident Assistant who had helped plan Pride Week. That RA was targeted when his room was set on fire and the State News received an anonymous call that it was only the first strike just before another target found their car soaked in gasoline. The Department of Public Safety claimed that the fire was caused by accident as opposed to intentional harassment, however, MSU President DiBiaggio put out a statement to condemn those who discriminate or harass. (The Final Report Vol. I of the University Wide Task-Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues, 1992: A History of the Gay and Lesbian Experience at Michigan State University)

(UA 12.3.14, Box 4454)

Click to enlarge (UA 12.3.14, Box 4454)

The 1990s was another rocky decade for the LGBT community. The 1990 Coming Out Day was met with a “seltzer bomb” (a two-liter bottle with ingredients that expand and explode), no injuries or damage was done but the Lesbian/Gay Council was outraged at the act (State News, Bomb Explodes at Assembly, 10/17/1990). In 1991, a MSU student brought Sigma Lambda Phi, a socially progressive fraternity, to campus as a place for both gay and heterosexual men to build community. The Final Report of the University-Wide Task Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues was published in 1992, outlining the history and giving suggestions to better the life of lesbian and gay students at Michigan State. Some of the suggestions included improvement in anti-discrimination policies, employment, LGBT curriculum/materials and campus education, admission, Greek Life, and mentioning. Queer Color, a group created for lesbian, bi, and gay minorities was established in 1994. Michigan State University employees were given health benefits for their same-sex domestic partners in 1998. 1999 Pride Week had a special event when the ten year time capsule was opened to show newspapers clippings a letters that helped students put in perspective where MSU and college campuses nation-wide have come in those ten years, and where it still needed to reach. (The State News)

(UA 12.3.14, Box 4454)

Click to enlarge (UA 12.3.14, Box 4454)

The LGBT community grew stronger and move visible as the new millennia came. In 2000, there was a push for a LGBT aide in the residence halls, similar to the minority aides (a position that today has developed into the Intercultural Aides), though the position was never established. Pi Kappa Phi was suspended in 2002 when pledges wore pink shirts with offensive phrases including “Fag Hairstylist” and others into a dining hall. The removed leaders of the fraternity did not try to appeal the national council’s ruling to close the chapter with the chance for recolonization the following fall. That March, MSU hosted a gay conference with an attendance expected to be over 1,000 people and events that included speakers and workshops. The event proved as a mark of success for both LGBT groups on campus and MSU leaders in their progression on-campus. MSU students held a rally in 2005 to show their disapproval with Michigan’s vote of Proposal 2. The Sesquicentennial Parade included a float titled “Cheers for Queers”, created by The Alliance of LBGT and Straight Ally Students, and was met with positive cheers from the crowd. That year also saw Conservative Coming Out Day, equipped with a mock closet, which upset the LGBT community as that group is usually associate with views against the LGBT community and implies certain things about what Coming Out means to their community (10/12/2005, State News). In 2006, Michigan State University was ranked in the top 100 best colleges for LGBT students, according to The Advocate College Guide for LGBT Students, written by Shane Windmeyer (State News). Not long after, a bathroom crawl was conducted to raise awareness and fight for gender neutral bathrooms and “inclusion of gender identity in the MSU anti-discrimination policy” (LBGT Resource Center webpage, 4/11/2007). Also in this decade, with respect and open-mindedness, MSU’s Department of Residence Life and its LGBT Resources Center began to work with students to take into consideration transgender students in their living arrangements on campus. Late in this decade, the program New2U was created to help LGBT freshmen acclimate to campus with connections to resources and weekly meetings. (The State News)
The current decade has seen some very positive events coming out of the hard work of the LGBT and Allies in the Michigan State and East Lansing community. In 2011, Residence Halls Association (RHA) partnered with the Red Cross to do a blood-drive that protested the life-ban on gay men. Someone could donate their blood along with a note that the blood was in honor of someone who could not donate, to display the amount of blood that could have been donated if both people were allowed. The LGBT Resource Center held a Queer and Career Conference that year, to help students in their transition into corporate America. That same year, the LGBT Specialization was in the works, as was a LGBT focused study abroad. Also in 2011, Ingham County had the second highest number of same-sex couples, after Washtenaw County (home to University of Michigan). “I am an Ally” program through the LGBT Resource Center gave allies a way “to give visibility and voice to people who are supportive of the LBGTQ community” (LGBT Resource Center: Programs and Services). In 2012, RHA officially passed a policy that allowed gender-neutral housing. In March of that year, the East Lansing City Council recognized the Gay Liberation Movement as a key player in becoming the nation’s first city to “ban discrimination based on sexual orientation” in 1972 and how MSU continues to follow their lead in bringing equality to the LGBT community (East Lansing City Council: A Resolution Commemorating the 40th Anniversary of East Lansing’s First-in-the-Nation Ban on Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation, 3/7/2012). 2013 was another year of pride and awareness at MSU and included Celebrate Bisexuality Day, the finalization of the LGBTQ and sexual studies Specialization. East Lansing also made big moves that year; the city gave same-sex couples the right to place their names in the city directory to be recognized by East Lansing, even if the state laws prevent their formal recognition. The city also received the high score of eighty-six on the Human Rights Campaign report, though it was scored prior to the domestic partnership registry, which would have brought the city to ninety-eight (The State News).
The past year has once again brought pride to the Michigan State University community. The LGBT Resource Center received an anonymous $1 million donation. In recent news, East Lansing scored a perfect 100 point score from the Human Rights Campaign for American cities based on “discrimination laws, relationship recognition, municipal employment policies, inclusiveness of city services, law enforcement and municipal leadership on LGBT issues” (State News, East Lansing gets perfect score from LGBT group, 11/13/14). The history of the LGBTQA community at Michigan State saw many ups and downs. Recent events prove that the tireless work and discrimination endured did not go unnoticed, and Michigan State, along with its City of East Lansing, has shown its commitment to progression.

Sources:
Lansing State Journal
Detroit Free Press
The State News
LGBT Resource Center
The Final Report Vol. I of the University Wide Task-Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues, 1992: A History of the Gay and Lesbian Experience at Michigan State University
East Lansing City Council: A Resolution Commemorating the 40th Anniversary of East Lansing’s First-in-the-Nation Ban on Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation, 3/7/2012

Written by Laura Williams





Holiday Hours and Upcoming Closings

12 11 2014

Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections will be closed Thursday-Friday, November 27-28, 2014 for the Thanksgiving holiday.  We will reopen Monday, December 1st, at 9:00 a.m.

From December 8, 2014 through January 23, 2015, the MSU Archives will be closed for on-site research.
This closure is due to renovations of our Reading Room and staff area. Archivists will be available by appointment.  Please contact the Archives to schedule an appointment or for more information.

We are sorry for the inconvenience and will try to accommodate researchers’ requests as best we can.








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