Scrapbook History: Leon L. Budd

21 01 2015

The Michigan State University Archives hold materials that are decades and even hundreds of years old. Recently, pulled from the shelf was a scrapbook from a student that graduated from this university in 1915, exactly one hundred years ago.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Leon L. Budd’s memory book has specific pages for events to record throughout his college career. He records the scores of various sporting games and writes “Yell – Rah! Rah! Rah! Uzz! Uzz! Uzz! M-A-C!”. There is even a section for interactions with professors, where Budd notes that one of the most valuable lessons he learned was to “study chemistry”.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

The next section lists his dear friends, along with their happiest memories at Michigan Agricultural College. “It’s never late till 12 pm and it’s early after that” wrote John S. Hancock of Hart, Michigan. Budd’s friends proved to have some fun with the advice “If you can’t be good be careful”. A couple students bonded over their hall placement with the saying “To Hell with Wells and Abbot its Williams Hall for us” and the rivalry continued “To H—L with Williams – Wells is The Gentlemen’s Dorm”.
The happy thoughts did not disappoint, below are a few favorites:
“Of what shall man be proud of if he is not proud of his friends”
“MAC did it”
“RAH! RAH! For M.S.C.”
“Eat, drink, and be merry”
And of courses they remind us that Michigan’s cold hit this generation as well; “It’s so cold in here that the thermometer is froze”

The chants and songs during the football games shows just how much tension there was (and continues to be) between State and Michigan. Here are just a few of the “College Yells”:

We’ll rub it into Michigan, Michigan, Michigan;
Rub it into Michigan, M.A.C. can.
On to old Michigan.
Rub it into Michigan, M.A.C. can.

Hi-le, hi-lo, hilo,
Michigan’ chances grow slimmer and slimmer
Hi-le, hi-lo, hilo
Michigan’s chances must go.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

School dances were also recorded, with marks next to the name of the dances done at a party. Budd attended quite a few dance parties during his time at Michigan State.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Mr. Budd also has some memorabilia from days as an engineering student. One poster depicts a skeleton at a desk with an open book to “MAC valves”. The bottom of the poster reads “=Ye=Faithful=Engineer=”.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

The following pages are filled with pictures from Leon Budd’s time at MSC. They include the “Fresh-Soph Rush. 1912. ’16 vs ‘15”, places on campus, his friends, his love interest, and himself. Following those are pages of classic scrapbook findings, the football program, class schedules, and newspaper clippings from the games.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

We really get a glimpse into life at Michigan State during Leon Budd’s time here. The buildings have changed, the style is different, and the course options have diversified, but the smiles and comradely seen between Budd and his classmates seem to be an everlasting effect of time at Michigan State.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 – UA 10.3.124

Written by Laura Williams

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Pioneers of International Education: Onn Mann Liang

26 03 2013
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Onn Mann Liang can be seen here in 1926, in his graduation cap and gown.

International students have been studying at Michigan State University for over 140 years, which the Archives’ new exhibit – International Students at Michigan State – outlines over here.  Recently, the scrapbooks and work documentation of one such student, Onn Mann Liang, have been uploaded to our On the Banks of the Red Cedar website almost in their entirety.  These donated materials provide the story of Liang’s life, mainly in pictures and a few brief correspondences, from late high school until the year before his death in 1957.

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Being an Engineering major, Liang seemed to have a fascination with bridges. This image is one of many he took of various bridges while in the US, and it shows him on campus standing on a small wooden structure.

Liang was one of a

group of twenty international students who studied at MSU in the 1920s, and he can even be seen in the first photo of the International Students exhibit with the International Studies group known as the Cosmopolitan Club (back row, third from the right).   His scrapbooks from the time he spent at MSU reveal how immersed he was in the campus lifestyle.  His photographs include images of himself and others canoeing and walking alongside the Red Cedar River or alternatively around the major sights of campus, such as Beaumont Tower or the Greenhouses; the pictures also reflect his interest in bridge engineering – multiple artistic shots of various bridges around MSU have been included.  These campus pictures are

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Liang was a prolific photographer, especially of MSU’s campus. This particular image appears to be on a bank of the Red Cedar River.

inter-mixed with oddly familiar and nostalgic college scenes of Liang looking perturbed at large drafting desks, reclining on lawn chairs, exploring nearby cities like Ann Arbor, and

finally posing in his long-awaited cap and gown.  While he was still attending school, Liang was known for the quality of his photographs (even winning a few awards), and his shots were good enough to open a photography studio in Lansing.

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Liang took this picture while in Chicago in 1928. The La Salle Street bridge is foremost in this image, but another two can be seen in the background.

After completing his undergraduate studies in 1926, Liang spent the next six years in the US travelling to various cities while also working for the Michigan State Highway Department.  Scrapbook images of Chicago show such famous buildings as the Tribune Tower as well as the La Salle Street Bridge – which was built and completed throughout the year of 1928, and, as a bridge enthusiast, could very well have been the reason for Liang’s visit to the city.   Within the next two years his travels also brought him to Buffalo, before he came back to Michigan and began working full time with the Highway Department.  Some of Liang’s final photographs include him among coworkers at the Department, prior to his return to China in 1932.

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This image shows Onn Mann Liang and his wife on their wedding day in 1936.

Wedding photographs from 1936 and registration documents as a Civil Engineer show Liang’s quick integration back into Chinese life.  Employment papers from the same period reveal Liang’s work as a primary engineer of dyke and bridge plans throughout his native country, which, just as with his time spent at the Michigan State Highway Department, was a direct application of the education he received from MSU.  After processing the Liang scrapbooks, it becomes apparent that he carried that education with him, even up to the last years of his life.  The final image of the Liang scrapbook shows him on a return trip to San Francisco alongside his wife and son – with the Golden Gate Bridge receding behind.





The 1906 College Experience

1 02 2013
Photo of Ruth Carrel with caption "Kedsies Angels (?)". Not clear if this refers to Robert or Frank Kedzie.

Photo of Ruth Carrel with caption “Kedsies Angels (?)”

After leafing through a scrapbook belonging to Miss Ruth Carrel, I began to ponder how different the life of an MAC student in 1906

M.A.C. Dorm Regulations, circa 1906

M.A.C. Dorm Regulations, circa 1906

was in comparison to an MSU student of today. While a lot might have changed in the world in the over one hundred years between her graduation and ours, surprisingly the college experience is still somewhat similar.
For instance, the dormitory regulations haven’t had much of a makeover since the turn of the 20th century. No nails or tacks were to be put in the walls, your floor had to be kept clear, no moving your dorm room furniture into the hallways or outside of your room, no throwing water or objects out of your dorm window to an unfortunate passerby, quiet hours existed, and any damage that happened to your room you would have to pay for at the end of the year. Sounds mighty familiar doesn’t it? While the curfews and room inspections at 7am have fallen away, the majority or rules have been retained.

Scrapbook page of team photos, newspaper clippings, & schedule, 1905-1906

Scrapbook page of team photos, newspaper clippings, & schedule, 1905-1906

Football was immensely popular, as it still is today. Students came together to celebrate their team as is evident by the Football banquet that was held each year to celebrate the players accomplishments that season. “Charming Co-eds, witty toasts, excellent viands, appropriate decorations,” were all apart of the party that year. Miss Carrel herself enjoyed a “season ticket” for the 1905 season that cost her $1.50.

Of course with all of its similarities, marked differences exist as well. For instance, what was your grade this past semester in Hygiene

Dance cards from Feronian Society & Colombian Literary Society events, 1904-1907

Dance cards from Feronian Society & Colombian Literary Society events, 1904-1907

or Domestic Art? Been to any term dances and added any new fellas names to your dance card? Perhaps you visited Wilson’s Sugar Bowl in Lansing and had one of their ” Very Popular Tutti Fruti” Sundaes? There are some experiences that Miss Carrel had that we will never be able to take part in, due to the fact that we live in a different age. It was a different time and life was different, but we have to ask ourselves, how different was it really?

Written by Sarah B., intern

Source: Ruth E. Carrel papers, UA 10.3.16 (Scrapbook #44)