MSU Archives’ Grand Re-opening on April 28th

27 04 2015

The Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections invites the public to our Grand Re-opening Celebration on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.  The evening begins at 6:30 p.m. with light refreshments in the lobby of Conrad Hall.  At 7:00 p.m. we will have opening remarks in the Conrad Auditorium.  Following that, Charles Keith will give a brief presentation on MSU’s Vietnam Project, a program which ran from 1955 to 1962.  The Archives will be open for behind-the-scenes tours before and after the talk.  This is a unique opportunity to see gems of the Archives’ collections, to tour areas of the Archives not typically accessible to visitors, and to meet and talk with the University’s archivists.

Parking is free is Lot #32 on Fee Road, and reservations are not required.

We look forward to seeing you at our Grand Re-opening Celebration!

Grand Reopening





Residence Hall Namesakes: East Neighborhood

26 03 2015

East Neighborhood

Students moving into Hubbard Hall, 1966

Students moving into Hubbard Hall, 1966

 

Forest H. Akers Hall

Forest H. Akers, 1945

Forest H. Akers, 1945

Forest H. Akers has his name in a few places at Michigan State, including the residence hall and golf course. Once a student at Michigan State, Akers played on the baseball team from 1905 to 1908 before he was expelled from school. His academics and behavior were not up to the Michigan State standard, but years later he was quoted saying “they were never, in all their history, more right” to expel students like him. Leaving Michigan State was not the end for Akers, he worked his way up at Chrysler and served on the State Board of Agriculture for almost two decades. Akers was a huge benefactor for Michigan State, establishing scholarships and donating resources for the golf course. Akers Hall, completed in 1964, is the architectural twin of Fee Hall.  Both were constructed to serve as student residences.

More information about Forest Akers can be found on the On the Banks of the Red Cedar website.

 

John C. Holmes Hall

John C. Holmes

John C. Holmes, Faculty Photograph

John C. Holmes had a significant role in the establishment of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU). He was secretary of the Michigan Agricultural Society and helped to push legislature to support MAC. Holmes was the first horticulture professor at MAC and served as an early member of the faculty from 1857 to 1862. During his time, he did a lot to ensure that the campus had beauty.  The dormitory that bears his name was built in 1965.

 

Bela Hubbard Hall

Bela Hubbard, Faculty Photograph

Bela Hubbard, Faculty Photograph

Bela Hubbard is considered one of the founders of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU). Hubbard was an educational pioneer, advocating for a broadening of courses to allow for a more “enlightened liberal education”. Outside of Michigan State, Hubbard was a Detroit geologist. He owned his own farm and would have been considered a naturalist. Hubbard enriched the Detroit community as well, and was one of forty original donors that established the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA).  Hubbard Hall (1966) is the tallest residence hall at MSU, with twelve stories and a penthouse level.





Residence Hall Namesakes: River Trail Neighborhood

11 03 2015

River Trail Neighborhood

Students walking near the Red Cedar River, undated

Students walking near the Red Cedar River, undated

 

Irma and Karl McDonel Hall

Karl McDonel

Karl McDonel

Irma and Karl McDonel were Michigan State people. McDonel graduated in 1916, immediately starting position as assistant to the Extension Director.  He later earned a masters in economics. President Frank Kedzie said “Mr. McDonel is in every way an unusual man, a thorough student, has an abundance of tact. He has a very pleasant manner and has unquestionable organizing ability” (First Hundred Years, Kuhn). McDonel served as Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture (now called Board of Trustees) from 1941 to 1960.  McDonel Hall (1963), designed in the International Style, is identical to Wonders Hall in the South Neighborhood.

 

Floyd Owen Hall

Owen, Brandes, & Huddleson receive the Distinguished Service Alumni Award, 1948

Owen, Brandes, & Huddleson receive the Distinguished Service Alumni Award, 1948

Floyd Owen was an early graduate of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU). Owen was a member of the Class of 1902 when buildings and housing on campus were sparse. He received the Distinguished Service Alumni Award in 1948. Owen was a benefactor to Michigan State University, and was a source of funds for the construction of Owen Hall. Built to accommodate graduate students, Owen Hall  was completed in 1960.

 

Robert S. Shaw Hall

John Hannah speaking with Robert Shaw

John Hannah speaking with Robert Shaw

Robert S. Shaw has a long standing history with Michigan State. For more than forty years, Shaw was a professor of agriculture, and spent years as dean of the college. Shaw also served as acting president of the Michigan State College (now MSU) three times and was the official president from 1928 to 1941. During his presidency, Shaw saw enrollment triple, the establishment of a graduate school, and many new departments created. Shaw was a true agriculture man at heart, and he himself attended an agriculture school in his native Canada.  Shaw Hall (1950) was the first of the residence halls designed in the International Style.

Shaw Hall at night, undated

Shaw Hall at night, undated

 

Sarah Van Hoosen Jones Hall

Marie Dye and Sarah Van Hoosen Jones

Marie Dye and Sarah Van Hoosen Jones

Sarah Van Hoosen Jones was a remarkable person. Jones earned a Ph.D. in science, and raised purebred Holsteins, making a name for herself as a “Master Farmer”. Jones was elected to the State Board of Agriculture in 1943. Jones, when told a building was to be named after her, insisted that it be named with her middle name “Van Hoosen”, because that was her mother’s maiden name and it was the family that raised her.  Van Hoosen Hall (1957) was originally a women’s cooperative residence with thirty-six apartments.

Written by Laura Williams





Residence Hall Namesakes: South Neighborhood

11 02 2015

South Neighborhood

 

Albert and Sarah Case Hall

A special dinner in Case Hall

A special dinner in Case Hall

Albert and Sarah Case were both part of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU) in their own way. Albert was a captain of the football team in 1901 and after his graduation in 1902, he became an engineer. Sarah was a beloved teacher when she instructed physical training at MAC. Together they established a scholarship in memory of their son. Years later, Case Hall residents sent Sarah Case flowers and cards by the hundreds for her 100th birthday. Built in 1961, Case Hall was the first hall to be designed for both men and women (in separate wings), but because of the co-ed function the students had a stricter dress code.

 

James and Lynelle Holden Hall

Construction of Holden Hall, 1966

Construction of Holden Hall, 1966

James and Lynelle Holden had Michigan ties in a few ways. James Holden was a Michigan State student (class of 1889) who went on to do great things. He became a philanthropist and worked specifically with the City of Detroit. One contribution they made was developing the Detroit Zoo, which people still enjoy today. Holden was also a real estate developer.  First opened in 1967, Holden Hall was the last of the South Complex dorms constructed.

 

Alfred G. and Mathilda R. Wilson Hall

John Hannah and Mrs. Wilson participate in the groundbreaking of Oakland University, 1958

John Hannah and Mrs. Wilson participate in the groundbreaking of Oakland University, 1958

Alfred G. and Mathilda R. Wilson both had interesting life paths. Alfred worked in lumber when he met Mathilda in Detroit, Michigan. They adopted two children together. Mathilda was born in Canada but spent much of her life in Detroit. For a short time, she was appointed Michigan’s first Lieutenant Governor, and later became a member of the State Board of Agriculture (later Trustees). She had a great deal of land in Rochester, Michigan which the couple donated to Michigan State for the creation of another branch of the university, Michigan State – Oakland, which later became Oakland University.  Wilson Hall, constructed in 1963, was designed by Ralph Calder.

 

Wallace and Grace Wonders Hall

Two students study in a Wonders Hall dorm room, undated

Two students study in a Wonders Hall dorm room, undated

Wallace and Grace Wonders were benefactors of Michigan State. Wallace Wonders was a Michigan State student from 1898 to 1902, when he graduated with a Bachelor of Science. Wonders was from Detroit, Michigan and came to East Lansing to study. Wonders and fellow South Neighborhood namesake Albert Case were classmates here at Michigan State.  Wonders Hall  The caption of the photo below details Wonder’s own experience with housing at Michigan State.

 

A small off-campus building, circa 1901. The back reads, "This cabin was rented by Marcus B. Stevens '02 and Wallace K. Wonders '02 to be used as a home while they worked a the college during the 1901 summer vacation. It was within easy walking distance of the campus. The drainage was good but the facilities were extremely minimum. The views were 100% rural. The social advantages were 0. If the truth is adhered to not too closely the clear air of the morning and the peace and quiet of the evening were disturbed only by the activities of the mosquetoes. As I remember it we had even in those days had a problem to face because our college was obliged to close all its eating clubs because of lack of funds. The college did not feel it could keep an eating club open for the working students so we had to shift (?) for ourselves. We are happy that we survived. Wallace K. Wonders."

A small off-campus building, circa 1901. The back reads, “This cabin was rented by Marcus B. Stevens ’02 and Wallace K. Wonders ’02 to be used as a home while they worked a the college during the 1901 summer vacation. It was within easy walking distance of the campus. The drainage was good but the facilities were extremely minimum. The views were 100% rural. The social advantages were 0. If the truth is adhered to not too closely the clear air of the morning and the peace and quiet of the evening were disturbed only by the activities of the mosquetoes. As I remember it we had even in those days had a problem to face because our college was obliged to close all its eating clubs because of lack of funds. The college did not feel it could keep an eating club open for the working students so we had to shift (?) for ourselves. We are happy that we survived. Wallace K. Wonders.”

Written by Laura Williams





Residence Hall Namesakes: Brody Neighborhood

11 02 2015

Brody Neighborhood

Brody Hall Cafeteria, 1954

Brody Hall Cafeteria, 1954

W. G. Armstrong Hall

Construction on Brody Complex, 1955

Construction on Brody Complex, 1955

W. G. Armstrong was an alumnus of Michigan State.  As many Spartans (once “Aggies” for Agriculture College), Armstrong was a farmer in his lifetime. After graduation, Armstrong continued his involvement with the college and became a member of the MSU Board of Trustees. Bryan Hall opened in 1956, along with two other Brody residence halls, Bailey and Emmons.

 

Liberty Hyde Bailey Hall

College Speculum Staff, Bailey seated second from left

College Speculum Staff, Bailey seated second from left

Liberty Hyde Bailey had his start as a Michigan State student in the Class of 1882. During that time, he founded and edited the Speculum, a student paper. Bailey studied with Dr. William Beal before becoming a professor himself. It is said that Bailey’s courses were so good that students were bringing their own seats to ensure they could attend his lectures. Bailey wrote more than 60 books and numerous articles, which became the backbone of horticulture literature. He was also known as the world’s “plant hunter.” Bailey was a man of science yet did not believe in Darwin’s theory of evolution, but rather took to the Bible’s origin of man. His name was a family name passed down by his abolitionist grandparents who used Liberty as a way to signify all deserved to be free.  Designed by Ralph Calder, Bailey Hall opened in 1955.

 

Claude S. Bryan Hall

Building Supervisor at Bryan Hall buffing the floor, 1957

Building Supervisor at Bryan Hall buffing the floor, 1957

Claude S. Bryan was Dean of Veterinary Medicine beginning in the late 1940’s. After he took the position, Bryan requested a change in facilities, class size, and pre-course work for veterinary students. Bryan’s efforts helped to create the Veterinary Medical Center on campus. Bryan Hall opened originally as an all male residence hall in 1954.

 

Kenyon L. Butterfield Hall

Butterfield Hall (Brody Complex), circa 1955

Butterfield Hall (Brody Complex), circa 1955

Kenyon L. Butterfield was a native Michigander from Lapeer. Butterfield graduated from Michigan State in 1891. After graduation, Butterfield held many positions in the area before returning to school to receive his Masters from the University of Michigan. Butterfield held presidency positions at two other colleges before resigning to return as president of Michigan State (1924-1928). Though a conflict over appointing two friends to executive positions at the college caused him to step down from presidency at Michigan State, Butterfield’s career included much more than his education positions and he held many international positions throughout his lifetime. Butterfield Hall first opened in 1954.

 

Lloyd C. Emmons Hall

An aerial view of Brody Complex, 1958

An aerial view of Brody Complex, 1958

Lloyd C. Emmons made many strides as a faculty at Michigan State. As Dean of the School of Science and Arts, also referred to as Liberal Arts, Emmons made many changes to programs and expectations within the school. While Dean, the a program for nursing was established in his school in 1950. Dean Emmons continued to teach for some time even while holding his position as a dean. Emmons was a professor of calculus. Dean Emmons also pushed for teacher preparation during his time at the college.  Emmons Hall first opened in 1955.

 

Howard C. Rather Hall

A view of Rather Hall, 1959

A view of Rather Hall, 1959

Howard C. Rather was a graduate of Michigan State. Part of the Class of 1917, Rather received a Bachelor of Science. Following his graduation, Rather joined the United States Army, and received an honorable discharge. After the war, Rather returned to Michigan State as a member of the faculty and eventually became a professor of Farm Crops. Rather also became the Dean of the Basic College during his career at Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU).  Rather Hall first opened in 1954, and its irregular plan is the reverse of Bailey Hall’s.

Written by Laura Williams





Residence Hall Namesakes: North Neighbohood

9 02 2015

North Neighborhood

The Union Building Entrance, 1940s

The Union Building Entrance, 1940s

Theophilus C. Abbot Hall

The original Abbot Hall (1), undated

The original Abbot Hall (1), undated

Theophilus C. Abbot was a professor of English, history and philosophy at Michigan State. Abbot was also a president of Michigan Agricultural College (1862-1885) and, even after resigning from this position, continued to teach at the university. The original Abbot hall was located near Beaumont Tower and became the Music Practice Building. It was demolished in 1968. The current Abbot Hall is located in North Neighborhood and opened in 1939 as an all male hall.

 

Stevens T. Mason Hall

The Steps of Mason Hall

The Steps of Mason Hall

Stevens T. Mason, also known as “boy governor”, was the acting governor of the Michigan territory and led the fight to statehood when he became the first governor of the state. During his governorship, Mason worked to build railways that would connect the rural parts of the state to economically thriving east. First opened in 1938, Mason Hall was an all male hall costing a student three dollars per week. Later it became a women’s hall and eventually switched to a co-ed hall, as it is today.

Glenn Phillips Hall

Snyder-Phillips Residence Hall, 1954

Snyder-Phillips Residence Hall, 1954

Glenn Phillips was a well-known landscape architect. From 1922 until his death, he worked on Michigan State development. Phillips helped plan the landscape expansion of Michigan State’s campus during the 1930s. His worked planned around the beloved Circle (where Beaumont Tower and the Music Building stand) to preserve the area. He worked to expand along the Red Cedar riverbanks. A graduate of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU), Phillips was a student in the Class of 1902. Outside of Michigan State, Phillips worked for the United States Bureau of Forestry.

 

Jonathan L. Snyder Hall

President Roosevelt rides in a REO motor car with President Snyder beside him, 1907

President Roosevelt rides in a REO motor car with President Snyder beside him, 1907

Jonathan L. Snyder was President of Michigan State from 1896 to 1915. During his presidency, the school grew from a couple hundred students to 2,000. Snyder worked with the legislature to aid in the growth of Michigan State through the hiring of more faculty and the construction of additional buildings to accommodate more students on campus. A big moment during Snyder’s time at Michigan State came after his successful effort to bring President Theodore Roosevelt to speak at the college for the semi centennial celebration.

 

Louise H. Campbell Hall

Louise H. Campbell Hall

Louise H. Campbell Hall

Louise H. Campbell was a pioneer for women at Michigan State. Campbell established a program that would help rural women students teach back in their communities. She also initiated the Annual Homemaker’s Conference which brought thousands of women to campus each year to learn from one another. Campbell was the head of Home Economics in the 1920s and helped advance women all over the state. Louise H. Campbell Hall opened in 1939 as an all female residence hall.

Maude Gilchrist Hall

Class of 1907 co-eds, Dean Gilchrist listed bottom row, middle right

Class of 1907 co-eds, Dean Gilchrist listed bottom row, middle right

Maude Gilchrist was a graduate of Michigan Agricultural College (now MSU). Gilchrist was a botanist who came to Michigan State’s campus in the early 1900s. Later, Maude Gilchrist served as Dean of the Women’s Department. As a woman of science, Gilchrist pushed to have the women’s program at Michigan State expand past homemaking. She insisted courses in the program should include music, art, and literature. Her fight proved that these subjects were just as important for women to learn as home economics. Gilchrist Hall was built in 1948 and as another women’s hall, it took the name of on of Michigan State’s early leaders.

 Linda E. Landon Hall

Miss Landon reads in the Linton Hall library

Miss Landon reads in the Linton Hall library

Linda E. Landon was a cherished part of the university’s history. Landon served as the librarian from 1891 to 1932 in the building that is now Linton Hall. Landon was also the first woman to teach at Michigan State.  The course she taught was English composition back in the 1890s. Before joining the staff at Michigan State, Linda Landon was a teacher in Kalamazoo, Michigan. She had graduated valedictorian of her class in Niles, Michigan and continued to impress throughout her life. Landon was a Daughters of the American Revolution member, as well as an honorary member of the Men’s Union Library society, as unlikely as that may have seemed. Remembered fondly by students, Linda Landon was honored as the namesake for the first post-WWII hall, built in 1947.

Mary B. Mayo Hall

Mary Mayo Hall, 1940

Mary Mayo Hall, 1940

Mary Bryant Mayo is credited for taking action to create the first women’s program at the college. When she was told that her life after marriage was defined by her ability to make butter, she began to study and established reading clubs for local youth. Mayo did not leave her home county of Calhoun until she was an adult. Pushed by her disappointment in the lack of opportunity for her daughters to receive the same education as males, Mayo fought to establish the first Women’s Course in 1896. Built in 1931, Mayo Hall was one of the first residence halls to accommodate women, and rightfully named for a woman that worked for their place at the university.

Sarah L. Williams Hall

Williams Hall (2), 1940

Williams Hall (2), 1940

Sarah Langdon Williams, wife of the university’s first President Joseph Williams, was a fighter for women’s rights. Part of the women’s suffrage movement and good friends with suffragist Susan B. Anthony, Williams was the founder and editor of the official publication for the movement, the Ballot Box. Recorded as a women who put her “energy to the cause of humanity oppressed”, Sarah Williams served as a nurse on the front lines of the Civil war and proved her passion and fight for humanity throughout her life. In 1937, Williams Hall was erected and dedicated to the admirable Sarah Langdon Williams.

Elida Yakeley Hall

An aerial shot of the construction of Yakeley Hall, circa 1948

An aerial shot of the construction of Yakeley Hall, circa 1948

Elida Yakeley was the college’s first registrar in 1908. After holding the position for thirty years, Yakeley was remembered for personally knowing all of the students who registered through her, each time standing to greet the arriving new students at her big desk. Yakeley was also secretary to President Snyder from 1903 to 1908. In 1939, Elida Yakeley was recognized for her work collecting and classifying material that would prove important to the history of Michigan State and named an associate in historical research. When it was finished in 1948, the next women’s hall was named after the thoughtful Elida Yakeley.

Written by Laura Williams





Scrapbook History: Leon L. Budd

21 01 2015

The Michigan State University Archives hold materials that are decades and even hundreds of years old. Recently, pulled from the shelf was a scrapbook from a student that graduated from this university in 1915, exactly one hundred years ago.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Leon L. Budd’s memory book has specific pages for events to record throughout his college career. He records the scores of various sporting games and writes “Yell – Rah! Rah! Rah! Uzz! Uzz! Uzz! M-A-C!”. There is even a section for interactions with professors, where Budd notes that one of the most valuable lessons he learned was to “study chemistry”.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

The next section lists his dear friends, along with their happiest memories at Michigan Agricultural College. “It’s never late till 12 pm and it’s early after that” wrote John S. Hancock of Hart, Michigan. Budd’s friends proved to have some fun with the advice “If you can’t be good be careful”. A couple students bonded over their hall placement with the saying “To Hell with Wells and Abbot its Williams Hall for us” and the rivalry continued “To H—L with Williams – Wells is The Gentlemen’s Dorm”.
The happy thoughts did not disappoint, below are a few favorites:
“Of what shall man be proud of if he is not proud of his friends”
“MAC did it”
“RAH! RAH! For M.S.C.”
“Eat, drink, and be merry”
And of courses they remind us that Michigan’s cold hit this generation as well; “It’s so cold in here that the thermometer is froze”

The chants and songs during the football games shows just how much tension there was (and continues to be) between State and Michigan. Here are just a few of the “College Yells”:

We’ll rub it into Michigan, Michigan, Michigan;
Rub it into Michigan, M.A.C. can.
On to old Michigan.
Rub it into Michigan, M.A.C. can.

Hi-le, hi-lo, hilo,
Michigan’ chances grow slimmer and slimmer
Hi-le, hi-lo, hilo
Michigan’s chances must go.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

School dances were also recorded, with marks next to the name of the dances done at a party. Budd attended quite a few dance parties during his time at Michigan State.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Mr. Budd also has some memorabilia from days as an engineering student. One poster depicts a skeleton at a desk with an open book to “MAC valves”. The bottom of the poster reads “=Ye=Faithful=Engineer=”.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

The following pages are filled with pictures from Leon Budd’s time at MSC. They include the “Fresh-Soph Rush. 1912. ’16 vs ‘15”, places on campus, his friends, his love interest, and himself. Following those are pages of classic scrapbook findings, the football program, class schedules, and newspaper clippings from the games.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

We really get a glimpse into life at Michigan State during Leon Budd’s time here. The buildings have changed, the style is different, and the course options have diversified, but the smiles and comradely seen between Budd and his classmates seem to be an everlasting effect of time at Michigan State.

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 UA 10.3.124

Scrapbook #320 – UA 10.3.124

Written by Laura Williams








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