1966 Game of the Century 50th Anniversary Celebration

15 09 2016

As we prepare to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1966 Game of the Century between Notre Dame and Michigan State, the university can remember it as the great national championship game that never was. Though American media outlets have gifted us with dozens of Games of the Century over the past fifty years, this one in particular is distinct. After what was a 60 minute clinical display of smash-mouth football, there was no celebration from the sidelines, no cheering from the grandstands, and no Gatorade baths. Instead, the game ended as it kicked-off: a tie. The game that would determine the 1966 college football season came and went, and in the end, settled nothing.

a001073

MSU halfback Dwight Lee (with ball) receives a not-so-kind embrace from Notre Dame’s Jim Lynch. A001073

Certain characteristics are required to qualify a college football game as a Game of the Century. They are played between the top two ranked teams in the national polls. In our 1966 case, the Irish entered the game as the top-ranked team with the defending coaches poll national champion Spartans sitting at number two. The second characteristic is that there must be great talent on the field to constitute a Game of the Century. That may never have been more the case than the 1966 game, which featured 25 players who would receive All-American recognition, 31 future NFL players, including ten first round picks, and the future number one overall selection in the draft: Bubba Smith.  Michigan State entered the game as a 4 point underdog to a team who had outscored their previous opponents 301-28; the Fighting Irish had both the top scoring offense and defense in the nation. The country’s best two teams met in East Lansing on November 19, 1966, in 33 degree temperatures under cloudy skies, in front of an attendance of 80,011. However, since both teams had already used their allotted national broadcasts, ABC could not televise the live game nationally. So instead of leaving the other regions of the country in the dark, the network made a decision to air the game after it had already ended. That evening, in a time very different from the modern college football landscape, more than an estimated 30 million people watched the ABC tape-delayed broadcast.

Both the Spartans and the Irish were steered by legendary coaches Duffy Daugherty and Ara Parseghian, respectively, and each had assembled outstanding defenses. The game lived up to its billing as a defensive struggle from the start and never yielded. Some of those who played in the game have recalled it being the most physical they had ever competed in, and that is confirmed by the violent sounds of crashing bodies described in college football folklore by players, coaches, and spectators. Early in the first quarter, Notre Dame’s star quarterback Terry Hanratty was hit particularly hard by defensive end Bubba Smith and linebacker Charlie Mad Dog Thornhill, separating his shoulder and ending his season.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

From the November 19, 1966 Spartan Gridiron Souvenir Program

In the second quarter, Michigan State ended a drive with a 4-yard rushing touchdown by Regis Cavender. Shortly after, Dick Kenney kicked a 47-yard field goal to extend the Spartan lead to 10. The Fighting Irish would strike back, however, with a 34-yard touchdown strike from backup quarterback Coley O’Brien to Bob Gladieux, which proved to serve as a crucial change in the momentum in the game. In the middle of the third quarter, O’Brien would orchestrate a long 70 yard drive that ended with a 28-yard kick from Joe Azzaro to tie the game 10-10 at the start of the final quarter. Spartan quarterback Jimmy Raye later threw an interception that set up Azzaro for an attempt to take the lead; however the kick went wide right from 42-yards out.

With a minute and half left in the game, Ara Parseghian’s team had possession of the ball near their own 30-yard line. Parseghian elected to call handoffs up the middle, instead of taking a shot at putting together a game-winning drive. Thus, the Game of the Century ended in a 10-10 tie. The Spartans won the total-yardage statistic 284 to 219. The crowd watched in disappointment as the two frustrated teams walked back into the tunnel. John Hannah and Father Teodore Hesburgh together visited both locker rooms to congratulate the players on an outstanding effort and competition.

a001072

MSU fullback Reggie Cavender (25) hurtles past the Norte Dame defensive forward wall on his way to an 11-yard gain to the Irish 9-yard line early in the second quarter.  A001072

Parseghian’s play-calling in this game would go on to earn him a lifetime of scrutiny, and to this day, he has had to defend his decision making. The following Monday, the State News wrote, “A modification of an immortal plea keeps running through my mind: ‘Go out and tie one for the Gipper.'” However, the State News understood what many emotional football fans did not. Michigan State’s season was over. Notre Dame, on the other hand, still had a trip to Los Angeles to take on a tough Southern California team. When the polls came out, Michigan State sat atop of the coaches’ poll and Notre Dame sat atop the AP poll. After the following Saturday’s Trojan beatdown at the hands of the Irish, Notre Dame was able to swing the coaches’ poll in their favor, as well. Neither school could play in a bowl game. Notre Dame did not partake in postseason games at the time, and since Michigan State had played in the Rose Bowl the year before, in accordance with the Big Ten’s policy at the time, they could not go again in a consecutive year.

Michigan State did win the vote of other polls, granting them the rights to some share of the national championship, which the university proudly remembers on the plaques outside Spartan Stadium. However, this  Game of the Century is primarily remembered for what it was not. In what was to be a national championship game played at the end of the regular season, two of the best teams in college football history came out even and  left empty-handed. Despite this disappointment, nevertheless, the Game of the Century legend will continue to live on in the memories of Michigan State University.

Written by Nick Kurtansky

gotc-event-flyer_revcgOn October 12, 2016 the University Archives will be hosting a 50th Anniversary Celebration of the 1966 Game of the Century at Michigan State University’s Conrad Hall.  The main program of the event will feature a discussion of the game by 1966 MSU Spartan Football players, including Jimmy Raye, Clinton Jones, Jerry West, and Sterling Armstrong. Sports radio broadcaster and author Jack Ebling will serve as moderator. Tom Shanahan, author of Raye of Light, will also join the discussion to provide insight into the historical importance of the Game of the Century.  The event is free and open to the public.  More information about the event is available at 1966gotc.eventbrite.com.  Kindly R.S.V.P. by October 5th online (1966gotc.eventbrite.com) or by calling the University Archives at (517) 355-2330.  We hope to see you there!





History of Temporary Housing on Campus after WWII

9 09 2016
a000106

Quonset Hut Village, 1946; A000106

With the start of a new school year, students move into either the campus dorms or off-campus housing. It’s always exciting to move into a new place, but what if you were starting your new school year in a Quonset Hut or a trailer? That was the reality for thousands of MSU students and new faculty members in 1946 and throughout the 1950s.

After the end of World War II, soldiers returning home were looking to continue on with their lives, by either returning to work, getting married and starting a family, or attending school. Now that returning soldiers had access to funding from the G.I. Bill, MSU President John Hannah opened up the college and welcomed the returning soldiers to campus. However, there was one huge problem: where to put the influx of students?

a000351

WWII Veterans Bunk in Jenison Fieldhouse, 1946; A000351

In 1946, the population of campus doubled in size. Campus went from 7,500 to 15,000 students, with 250 faculty members also being added. With the explosion of people, there wasn’t enough permanent housing for everybody. To prepare for the influx, plans were made to house the faculty along with married students. The temporary housing structures for the students included: 449 demountable trailers for families, grouped around 16 attractive service buildings constructed by the College; 104 Quonset Huts to house 1,456 single men, together with a bath house with forty showers and a cafeteria and kitchen to feed 2,000 persons; steel barracks to house 240 single men; and 1,100 family units erected by the Federal Public Housing Authority. For faculty members, 50 temporary houses were built, which included 32 Quonset Huts and 18 British Empire Flat Top houses (Brookover Memoir). With all the new construction taking place, not everything could be completed by the summer of 1946. For that reason, 600 men slept in bunk beds on the floor of Jenison Fieldhouse, and 200 women slept on the top floor of the Union until other housing became available.

a000074

Aerial View of Campus over the Temporary Housing Area, 1946; A000074

The temporary housing spread across a large portion of campus. The Quonset Huts and the cafeteria were located in the area of campus where the Breslin Center is now. The trailer housing was located between Harrison and Kalamazoo Streets. The faculty brick apartments were located on Cherry Lane, which was between Harrison and Birch Streets, and the temporary apartments were located between Birch and Chestnut Street. (This description of locations is based off a map of campus from 1950.)

Surprisingly, people have fond memories of living in the Quonset Huts. The men returning from war didn’t mind living in the Quonset Huts because it was something they were already used to from living in the army barracks during the war. According to Edna Brookover’s memoirs about living in the Faculty Quonset Village, she did admit that she cried after visiting campus and learning she would be living in a Quonset Hut, but after moving in and settling into her new life, she enjoyed it. She talked about how the Village was a true “cosmopolitan community” with all the various people and children interacting with each other. As stated by Brookover, “there was always a friend around and a pot of coffee ready at most neighbors’ homes. One could always borrow an egg, a cup of sugar, or whatever. We learned to share. We formed car pools, baby sitting leagues, etc.”

The University and the Director of Married Housing on campus were very responsive to the needs of the Quonset Hut Village community. A storage Quonset Hut, playground equipment, a nursery school, a postal station, and a cooperative grocery were built to help support the Village. As time passed, people saved enough money to buy a house off campus, and as new dormitories were built, students moved out of the barracks.

a000378

Quonset Cafeteria, circa 1946; A000378

The Quonset Huts were only supposed to be occupied for a few years, but instead, some stood until the late 1980s! Faculty still lived in the huts as late as 1959, and WKAR broadcasted most of their programs from the large cafeteria Quonset Hut that was converted into a television station.  As the years passed, the Quonset Huts were used for different purposes but were slowly demolished. In 1981, six of the last standing twenty Quonset Huts were torn down, and the rest were razed either in 1987 or 1988 to make room for the Breslin Center.

The Quonset Huts and other interim housing structures were a temporary fix to help the overcrowding of students coming in after the end of WWII. This explosion of people would help lead MSU to become the university that it is today. To learn more about what life was like living in a Quonset Hut, visit the Archives and read Edna Brookover’s “Life in Faculty Quonset Village on Cherry Lane-1946” which is part of collection UA 17.156 Wilbur Brookover Papers.

Written by Jennie Russell, Assistant Records Archivist

 





Audiovisual Collections: Spring 1957 Commencement Film

19 08 2016

 

A001832

Michigan State University President John A. Hannah (left) with U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon (right) at MSU’s 1957 commencement (resource identifier A001832)

 On June 9, 1957, Vice President of the United States Richard M. Nixon gave the commencement address at Macklin Stadium (now Spartan Stadium) to Michigan State’s graduating class.  In a photograph from the Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections, Nixon can be seen standing next to MSU President John A. Hannah after the ceremony.

Nixon_film2_1957

1957 Commencement film reel

Additionally, a 16mm reel of motion picture film of this event is also in the University Archives’ collections. The film, approximately 800’ in length (roughly twenty-two minutes long), contains moving image and optical sound elements from the Spring 1957 commencement.  A :30 silent clip of the commencement can be viewed on YouTube.

If you would like to help preserve Spartan history and get this footage preserved and digitized for online access, please consider donating to the MSU Film and Video Preservation Fund (https://www.givingto.msu.edu/gift/?sid=1484). More information about the Film Fund can be found here: http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2014/msu-archives-preserves-spartan-history/.

Written by Matthew Wilcox, Audiovisual Archivist

Note: Commencement programs are available on the On the Banks of the Red Cedar website (http://onthebanks.msu.edu/Object/1-4-10E8/commencement-programhome-page/), including the 1957 commencement program.

Additional information about Vice President Nixon’s visit can be found in the Commencement Records (UA 13.1).





Dictaphone Cylinders of the Edward Miller Sr. collection

20 06 2016
Dictaphone box

Box of Dictaphone cylinders from the Edward Miller Sr. collection

In 1977, the University Archives & Historical Collections received the papers of Edward Miller Sr.  The bulk of these papers consist of the records of the Sheldon School of Business (circa 1910-1935) of Chicago.  The School packaged business courses, primarily selling courses, and then sold them to various business schools throughout the country.  The school was a financial casualty of the Depression and in the 1930’s Miller bought the assets of the school.  The Sheldon School materials consist of records, publications, promotional materials, scrapbooks, etc.

The collection also includes a box of Dictaphone cylinders, an audio recording format popular in the first half of the 20th century.  The first Dictaphone machine was created only a few years after Thomas Edison created his first phonograph recording device, but by 1907 the name “Dictaphone” was so successful that it became a synonym for all recording devices of similar use, even though Edison tried to regain the dominance of his own “Ediphone”.  The cylinders in the Edward Miller Sr. collection contain recordings of lectures from the Sheldon School.

Dictaphone1

Box of Dictaphone cylinders from the Edward Miller Sr. collection

Until recently, the only means of playing back the audio recorded onto a Dictaphone cylinder would involve the use of a mechanical stylus, similar to that of a needle playing an LP record.  However, no-contact technology such as the imaging tool IRENE at the Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC) in Andover, MD, can eliminate the possibility of damage caused by the use of a stylus.  The IRENE service creates ultra high-resolution images of the audio grooves, then converts those image files into an audio file.

Dictaphone4

Box of Dictaphone cylinders from the Edward Miller Sr. collection

With many archived forms of audio and moving image media being available only on obsolete formats, reproduction of the recorded material on these documents can prove to be difficult.  Technological breakthroughs such as NEDCC’s IRENE technology can isolate audiovisual material while still maintaining the integrity of the material’s obsolete carrier.

 

Written by Matthew Wilcox, Audiovisual Archivist

 

“History of Dictaphone.” Sound Recording History. www.soundrecordinghistory.net. Web. 18 June 2016.

Open Entry: Michigan Archival Association Newsletter 4.2 (1977): 7. Print.





Upcoming Closings

13 06 2016

The Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections will be closed June 16-17, 2016.  If an emergency arises please call our main phone number and leave a voicemail (http://archives.msu.edu/about/contact.php?about_contact).

We are sorry for the inconvenience.

We will reopen on Monday, June 20th at 9:00 a.m.  Please see our website for additional upcoming closings.





Collections Spotlight: Lewis Richards papers

18 05 2016
lr

Lewis Richards

Lewis Richards was born April 11, 1881, the son of Reverend Jonathan and Huldah Richards, in St. Johns, Michigan. After attending school in Ann Arbor, he studied music at the University of Michigan Conservatory.  He then continued his studies at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Brussels, Belgium. Richards graduated with distinction in piano from the Royal Conservatory, the first American to do so.

Richards married Berthe Smedt, a native of Belgium, in 1908, and they had two children, Elsa Loomis and Roger Lewis.

Presentation1

Berthe and Lewis on their wedding day, 1908

Also in 1908, Richards began his professional music career, touring Europe and America. In America Richards played at the White House, Steinway Hall, Carnegie Hall, and many others.

Richards took a hiatus from touring during World War I to become General Secretary (later Director) of the London Office of the Commission for Relief in Belgium.  Its purpose was to organize food supply routes from France to Belgium, which was occupied by German forces. The Commission was part of the U.S. Food Administration, headed by Herbert Hoover. Richards was awarded the Médaille de la Reconnaissance française in 1919 for his efforts.

After living abroad, Lewis Richards and his family returned to Michigan. In 1927 he became head of the Music Department at Michigan State College. He was not only instrumental in expanding the music program, but also in the planning of the modern music building on the Michigan State College campus built in 1939.

music bldg dedication

Music Building dedication program

Richards was a member of several professional organizations: the Capet String Quartet, Societe des Instruments Anciens of Paris, Beethoven Association of New York, Alpha Epsilon Mu, Phi Mu Alpha, Association of American University Professors, and Kappa Sigma. He also received an honorary M.A. from Wesleyan College.

 

baton

Richards’ conducting baton

The Lewis Richards Collection contains correspondence, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, musical programs, legal documents, and other items primarily involving the musical career of Lewis Richards.

Most notable among the correspondence is Queen Mary’s secretary stating payment for the Queen’s purchase of two cushions at an exhibition of Belgian Lace supporting the Belgium Relief Commission.

royal letter

Also included is correspondence from President Herbert Hoover thanking Lewis for a performance at the White House, and a second letter extending sympathy to Mrs. Richards at the death of her husband in 1940. Correspondence from MSC Presidents Shaw and Hannah is also included in the collection. The bulk of the correspondence deals with family matters.

kids.jpg

Richards’ children, Elsa and Roger

Also in the collection are many newspaper clippings announcing Richards’ recitals throughout the United States, and a collection of obituary notices after his death in 1940.

The four scrapbooks in the collection provide a detailed account of Richards’ activities on tour and at Michigan State College. The first scrapbook contains newspaper clippings announcing his performances and critiques of his playing ability in the United States and in Europe. The second scrapbook contains clippings from local newspapers about campus life during Richards’ years at the college. The third scrapbook contains newspaper clippings about his recitals. The fourth scrapbook, given to Richards by the Department of Publications at Michigan State College, contains newspaper clippings pertaining to the new MSC music building and dedication festivities.

Several programs from Richards’ recitals are also included within the collection, from Carnegie Hall to the MSC Concert Course at the People’s Church in East Lansing. Also in the collection is an issue of the Bulletin containing an announcement of artists for the 1929 season at Steinway Hall, listing Lewis Richards as harpsichordist. MSC publications within the collection include the 1931 MSC Music Department catalog with short biographies of music faculty.

The collection also contains legal documents involving royalties for a musical composition, a monetary valuation of the estate of Lewis and Berthe Richards, passports, marriage certificates, and population registers from Belgium.

The Arthur and Gertrude Farwell papers in the collection contain a nativity ceremonial by Gertrude and a music composition by Arthur, head of theoretical subjects at the MSC music department.

The Lewis Richards papers are open to researchers at the Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections. The finding aid for the collection is available online: http://archives.msu.edu/findaid/ua17-183.html.

 

Content curated by Megan Badgley Malone, collections & outreach archivist

 





Gordon E. Guyer (1926-2016)

1 04 2016

A004804

It saddens us to hear of Gordon Guyer’s passing on Wednesday, March 30th.  The University Archives & Historical Collections would like to extend our condolences to former President Guyer’s family and friends.

Gordon Guyer was a member of the MSU community for many decades.  Guyer came to Michigan State University in 1947 under the G.I. Bill and studied entomology.  He received his bachelor’s degree (1950), master’s degree (1952) and Ph.D. (1954) from MSU. He became a MSU faculty member in 1953. He is the author of over 60 scientific papers, some used as basic reference material in entomology.

Prior to being appointed as President of Michigan State University, Guyer was a professor and chairman for the Department of Entomology, and the director of the Pesticide Research Center at MSU. In the mid-1970s he led one of the first American scientific groups allowed to visit China.  He also served as the director of MSU Extension from 1973 to 1985. Guyer became MSU’s 18th President on September 1, 1992, and served for one year.

Dr. Guyer served as consultant to the following groups: Michigan Vegetable Growers’ Association, Michigan Farm Bureau, Agricultural Council, Michigan Departments of Health, Conservation, and Agriculture; Agriculture and Ways and Means Committees, Michigan Legislature, and the Michigan Governor’s office. He also held high-level positions at the Michigan Department of Agriculture, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, and the Kellogg Biological Station. He also was chairman of the Biological Science committee and a member of the Athletic Council at MSU.

Guyer received a National Science Foundation grant to participate in the International Congress of Entomology in London, 1964. He also received MSU’s Distinguished Faculty Award in 1965.

The Gordon E. Guyer papers are open to researchers at the Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections.  The finding aid for the collection is available online: http://archives.msu.edu/findaid/ua2-1-18.html